Exciting News and Blogs

Little House of Science Blog Post March

CD Balloon Hovercraft Experiment

 

Build your very own hovercraft at home with this simple and fun science experiment.

 

You Will Need:

 

  • 1 x CD

  • 1 x balloon

  • 1 x pop-up bottle lid

  • superglue



The Experiment

 

  1. Glue the closed bottle cap to the centre of the CD so that the bottom covers the hole in the centre of the CD to make sure there is an airtight seal.

  2. Blow up the balloon but don’t tie it - pinch or twist the neck so that the air does not escape

  3. Stretch the neck of the balloon over the top of the closed cap

  4. Put the hovercraft on an open, smooth surface, untwist the balloon, and pull the pop-up cap open.

  5. Push the hovercraft and watch it glide around



The Science

 

When you open the pop-up lid, the air escapes from the balloon and spreads out under the CD, creating a cushion of air between the CD and the flat surface. This reduces friction, lifts the CD, and causes it to float, hover, and glide freely over the smooth surface.



Want More Epic Experiments?


If you enjoyed this experiment and want more fun, more science, and more epic experiments, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!

20 Fascinating & Fun Science Facts: Oxygen

 

We need this vital element to survive, but how much do actually you know about oxygen? Test your knowledge with these 20 fascinating and fun science facts.



1. Oxygen is an element with the chemical symbol O and atomic number 8. Oxygen has 8 electrons and 8 protons.

 

2. Oxygen is classified as a gas and nonmetal and is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table. It has an atomic weight of 15.999 and a density of 1.429g/L.

 

3. At normal pressure and temperature, oxygen is composed of two oxygen atoms which join to form dioxygen (O2), a colourless, tasteless, odourless gas.

 

4. Under standard conditions, oxygen is a gas at room temperature. It has a melting point of -218.79℃ and boiling point of -182.95℃.

 

5. Oxygen is made of three stable isotopes: O-16, O-17, and O-18. O-18 is the most abundant isotope of oxygen, with an occurrence of  99.762%.

 

6. Oxygen is a very reactive element that likes to bind with other elements and easily forms compounds such as oxides. However, the only two elements it does not form a compound with are helium and neon. The process of oxygen combining with other atoms to make compounds is called oxidation.

 

7. Oxygen supports combustion and is required for fire, but itself does not burn and is not flammable.

 

8. Liquid oxygen is pale blue in colour and magnetic.

 

9. Oxygen dissolves in water. Fresh water contains about 6.04 mL of oxygen per litre, whereas seawater contains approximately 4.95 mL of oxygen per litre.

 

10. Oxygen is essential to human life and is needed by most lifeforms on Earth to survive. Animals and plants require it for respiration. It is found in the air we breathe and the water we drink (as H2O).

 

11. Oxygen makes up around 21% of the Earth’s atmosphere. It makes up around 50% of the Earth’s crust, making it the most common element in the Earth. Oxygen is also the third most abundant element in the universe and the most abundant element in the human body, making up 65% of the body’s mass. 1% of the Sun’s mass is oxygen.

 

12. Oxygen plays an important role in life on Earth. This role is carried out through the oxygen cycle which is the movement of oxygen between air, living things, and the Earth’s crust.

 

13. Oxygen found in the air is produced by photosynthesis - without plants there would be little oxygen in the air. Most oxygen on Earth comes from tiny ocean plants called phytoplankton.

 

14. Oxygen also exists as the allotrope, ozone. Ozone O3 is a different form of oxygen that combines three oxygen atoms together to create trioxygen. Ozone O3 forms the ozone layer in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. It protects the Earth from the sun’s harmful rays by filtering UV light.

 

15. Oxygen was discovered in 1771 by Swedish pharmacist Carl Wilhelm Scheele. However, he didn’t publish his results right away until after British chemist Joseph Priestley published his discovery of oxygen in 1774.

 

16. The name oxygen was first used by French chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier in 1777 and comes from the Greek word oxygenes which means acid producer.

 

17. Oxygen has many practical uses. It is most commonly used in the manufacture of steel. It is also used for smelting metal from ore, to filter water, for making plastic, and creating rocket fuel. Tanks of oxygen are also used to treat those with breathing problems and as life support for astronauts and scuba divers.

 

18. Too much oxygen is however bad for us and causes a condition called the bends which is a particular problem for astronauts and scuba divers. This causes tiny bubbles in the blood which can be painful and sometimes deadly.

 

19. 300 million years ago when oxygen levels were higher, insects grew bigger. Dragonflies were once as big as birds!

 

20. The green colour of the aurora borealis, or northern lights, is caused by solar wind particles colliding with oxygen atoms in the earth’s atmosphere.



Want to learn more about oxygen, the elements, the periodic table, and chemistry? For more science, more amazing facts, and more fun, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!

Little House of Science Blog Post February

Lava Lamp Experiment 

Create your very own lava lamp using materials found at home in this fun and simple science experiment. 

You Will Need: 

  • Vegetable Oil

  • Water

  • Food Colouring

  • Empty Water Bottle

  • Alka-Seltzer Tablets

  •  

The Experiment 

  1. Fill the empty water bottle ¾ full with oil

  2. Fill the remaining ¼ of the bottle with water

  3. Wait for the layers of water and oil to separate and settle

  4. Add several drops of food colouring into the bottle which will pass through the oil and colour the water

  5. Break the Alka-Seltzer tablet into 3-4 smaller pieces and drop a piece in. Here come the bubbles!

  6. When the bubbling stops, drop another piece in for more bubbles!

 

The Science 

The oil and water separate and oil stays above the water because it is lighter and less dense. This also occurs because water is a polar molecule and the oil is a nonpolar molecule so they do not mix.

The food colouring has the same density as the water so it sinks through the oil into the water at the bottom of the bottle. 

Once you add the Alka-Seltzer tablet, it sinks into the water, fizzes, and dissolves because the citric acid and baking soda in the tablet react with water, creating sodium citrate and carbon dioxide gas. 

The gas is lighter than the water so it rises to the top in the form of bubbles. Some of the coloured water attaches to the bubbles. The bubbles reach the top and pop as the gas escapes, and the colour sinks back down into the water.

This continues to occur until the Alka-Seltzer finishes reacting and you add more Alka-Seltzer to keep the reaction going.

 

Want More Epic Experiments? 

If you enjoyed this experiment and want to learn more, want more fun, more science, and more epic experiments, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!

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20 Fascinating & Fun Science Facts: The Human Heart

 

Test your knowledge with these 20 fascinating and fun facts about the human heart.

1. The heart is a muscular organ that pumps blood around the body as part of the circulatory or cardiovascular system. It pumps blood through blood vessels to almost 75 trillion cells to provide the body with oxygen and nutrients.

2. Your heart is located in your chest and is protected by your rib cage. 

3. The heart weighs about 300g and is about the size of your fist. 

4. The average heart beats about 60-100 times per minute, 4,800 times per hour, over 100,000 times a day, and 42 million times a year. During a lifetime it could beat more than 3 billion times. 

5. The average adult has about 10.5 pints of blood in their body. 

6. The heart pumps around 280 litres of blood through the body every hour, 7,200 litres in 24 hours, and 2 million litres per year. 

7. Blood pressure in the heart can squirt blood over 30 feet. 

8. When resting, it takes 6 seconds for blood to travel from your heart to your lungs and back again, 8 seconds to go to the brain and back, and 16 seconds to go to your toes and back.

9. When exercising, your heart beats faster to pump more blood and oxygen to your muscles. 

10. If you lined all of your blood vessels - arteries, veins, and capillaries - up in a row, they would be over 60,000 miles long. 

11. The cells that make up blood are constantly regenerating after a life of about 4 months. Bone marrow produces approximately 3 million new red blood cells every second.

12. The heart is made up of chambers - the left atrium, right atrium, left ventricle, and right ventricle - and valves, which ensure blood keeps moving in the right direction. 

13. Blood that leaves the heart is carried through arteries. The main artery leaving the left ventricle is called the aorta and carries oxygenated blood to all parts of the body. The main artery leaving the right ventricle is called the pulmonary artery which carries deoxygenated (blood without oxygen) to the lungs. 

14. Blood going towards the heart is carried through veins. Oxygen-rich blood comes from the lungs to the left atrium carried through pulmonary veins. Deoxygenated blood from the body is brought into the right atrium through the superior vena cava and inferior vena cava. 

15. The cardiac cycle occurs when the heart contracts and makes the chambers smaller and pushes blood into blood vessels. When the heart relaxes the chambers get bigger and fill with blood coming back into heart.

16. Blood entering the heart is a purplish-blue because it does not contain oxygen. Blood exiting the heart is red because it contains oxygen. 

17. Electricity going through the heart makes the muscle contract. The heart can continue to beat outside the body as long as it has sufficient oxygen due to this electricity. 

18. An ECG machine is used to measure electricity going through the heart and is used by doctors to examine your heart. 

19. Study of the heart is known as cardiology. 

20. Heart illnesses, also known as cardiovascular diseases, include heart attack, heart disease, hypertension, and heart failure. To keep your heart healthy and prevent cardiovascular disease, you need to do regular exercise and eat healthily.

 

Want to learn more about our amazing heart and the human body? For more science, more amazing facts, and more fun, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!

 

Little House of Science Blog Posts January

20 Fascinating & Fun Science Facts: Planet Mars

 

Impress your family and friends with these 20 fascinating and fun facts about Mars.

 

1. Mars is also known as the Red Planet. This is because Mars is covered in soil, rock, and dust made from iron oxide which gives the surface a red rusty colour.

 

2. Mars is named after the Roman god of war.

 

3. Mars has 2 moons called Deimos and Phobos. They are named after the two horses that pull the Roman god of war, Mars’, chariot. They may be asteroids captured by Mars’ gravity.

 

4. Mars is the 4th planet from the sun. It is 227,936,637 km (141 million miles) away from the sun. It would take 300 days (around 8 months) to get there from Earth.

 

5. Mars is smaller than Earth with a diameter of 4217 miles. This makes it the second smallest planet in our solar system.

 

6. A day on Mars lasts 24 hours and 37 minutes.

 

7. One year on Mars is 687 days long. That’s 1.9 Earth years. This is because Mars is further away from the sun so it takes longer to orbit it.

 

8. The tilt on the axis of Mars is 25 degrees which means that the planet experiences seasons like we do on Earth as different parts of the planet are closer to the sun at different times of its orbit.

 

9. Mars has a thin atmosphere made from 95.9% carbon dioxide and 2.7% nitrogen. The atmosphere is so thin that it’s not thick enough to trap the sun’s heat so it is very cold - ranging from -100℃ in winter to 20℃  in summer.

 

10. Mars has very weak gravity. Gravity on Mars is 37% less than on Earth. This means that on Mars you could jump 3x higher than on Earth.

 

11. Mars is a terrestrial planet because it has a hard and rocky surface. Its northern side is full of flat plains and the southern side has ridges and craters.

 

12. Mars’ surface has many channels, plains, and canyons which could have been caused by water erosion (water wearing away the surface). This could be evidence that open water in liquid form once existed on the surface billions of years ago.

 

13. Mars experiences violent dust storms powered by the sun which can last for months. The dust storms can completely cover the planet and continually change Mars’ surface.

 

14. Mars is home to Olympus Mons, a dormant volcano and the largest volcano and highest mountain in our solar system. It is 16 miles high and 600 km across the base, making it 3x the height of Mount Everest.

 

15. The biggest crater on Mars is Borealis Basin. It is 5300 miles from end to end and covers 40% of planet’s surface.

 

16. Mars has the largest canyon in our solar system, Valles Marineris. It is 4 miles deep and stretches thousands of miles long.

 

17. Mars has north and south poles like earth. The polar ice caps are covered in a layer of frozen carbon dioxide (dry ice).

 

18. As it’s so close to Earth, Mars is the planet that humans will most likely step foot on and explore first.

 

19. We sent out Mars Rovers (which are like robots) on missions to explore Mars and collect samples and record scientific data for scientists on Earth to study. Some of these Rovers include Viking 1, Viking 2, Mars 2, Mars 3, Spirit, Phoenix, Pathfinder, Curiosity, and Opportunity.

 

20. There is no evidence of life on Mars. However, it is the planet with the best conditions to support life and scientists believe there is potential for life under the surface of mars because they recently found water ice just under the surface.



Want to learn more about Mars, the planets, our solar system, and the whole universe? For more science, more amazing facts, and more fun, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!

 

 

Diet Coke & Mentos Geyser Experiment

 

Make a geyser at home with diet coke and mentos. This super simple and fun science experiment will amaze your friends and family.

 

You Will Need:

 

  • Roll of mentos

  • 2 litre bottle of diet coke

  • Piece of paper

  • Playing card

 

This experiment should be carried out outside as it will make a mess!

 

The Experiment

 

  1. Open your bottle of diet coke

  2. Place the bottle upright on flat ground

  3. Unwrap the whole roll of mentos

  4. Roll the piece of paper into a tube just wide enough to load the mentos into

  5. Hold the tube upright and cover the bottom of the tube with the card

  6. Hold the tube and card directly on top of the bottle with the tube aligned with the mouth of the bottle

  7. Drop about half a pack of mentos into the tube, keeping the card in position directly over the mouth of the bottle and covering the bottom of the tube

  8. Pull the card out from under the tube, letting the mentos drop into the bottle

  9. Run out of the way and watch as the geyser erupts!

  10. Repeat the experiment with different fizzy drinks and different amounts of mentos to see which produces the largest eruption!

 

The Science 

Why do the mentos and diet coke erupt?

 

Diet coke is fizzy and bubbly because it contains carbon dioxide gas. This carbon dioxide is waiting to escape the liquid in the form of bubbles.

 

When you drop something into a bottle of soda, this process is sped up. The surface tension is broken and the bubbles leave the soda and attach to the object. This process is called nucleation, and the places where the bubbles form are called nucleation sites.

 

As you drop the mentos into the soda, bubbles form all over the surface. Mentos are covered in loads of tiny dimples which increase the surface area and create more nucleation sites where nucleation occurs as carbon dioxide in the drink forms bubbles.

 

Loads of nucleation sites means more nucleation and loads of bubbles as the carbon dioxide leaves the soda and attaches to the mentos. Nucleation occurs to such a large extent that the gas that escapes from the soda and onto the mentos increases the pressure and pushes the liquid up and out of the bottle into a massive geyser!



Want More Epic Experiments?
If you enjoyed this experiment and want to learn more about nucleation in greater detail, want more fun, more science, and more epic experiments, enrol now in our science holiday camps and spring term science classes where kids can learn, experiment, explore, and play!



Autumn 2017: Little House of Science has been nominated by Little London: Runner UP Best Kids' Club, Group or Class

 

 

 

3rd Annual IOP YOUNG SCIENTIST AWARD 2017 - CALLING ALL YOUNG SCIENTISTS!

The Institute of Physics (IOP) in partnership with Little House of Science invites you to take part in Young Scientist Award 2017 on Saturday, 13 May 2017 from 10.00-12.00.
There will be a age adjusted science quiz for 6-11 year old children, followed by a science demonstration and award ceremony.
To join us of this free event, email us at info@littlehouseofscience.com with the full name and age of your child.

Young Scientist Award 2017

 

Tackling Pollution in London Event 23 March 2017

ClientEarth, Kings College London and Little House of Science invite you to find out why London is the UK's most polluted city, how this is damaging our health,  and what you can do to protect yourself and your family.  

Hear from ClientEarth's pioneering lawyers and policy advisers, as well as health and transport professionals, who will explain the problems we all face with London's filthy air and why we should all be working to tackle pollution for the protection of our children and future generations. 

 

From 9.45am - 12.00 noon, Thursday 23 March 2017  Royal Geographical Society 1 Kensington Gore, London, SW7 2AR 

Speakers include James Thornton (CEO, ClientEarth) and Prof. Frank Kelly  (Chair in Environmental Health, Kings College London) 

Refreshments will be provided.  RSVP with any access requirements to cthomson@clientearth.org  

info@clientearth.org | www.clientearth.org

t. +44 (0) 207 749 5970

ClientEarth home   HealthyAir

 

 

Little House of Science in Hampshire and Buckinghamshire!

We are very proud to announce that we are offering all our classes in Hamphire and Buckinghamshire now!

 

 

 

What an excited morning we had again at the IOP Young Scientist Award 2016 on 18 June! Well done to all our Young Scientist this year.

Thank you very much to everyone at the IOP, you made the day with your fantastic workshops very much fun after all the hard work the children put in during the science quiz! 

        

 

CALLING ALL YOUNG SCIENTISTS!
The Institute of Physics (IOP) in partnership with Little House of Science invites you to take part in Young Scientist Award 2016 on Saturday, 18 June 2016 from 10.00-12.00.
There will be a age adjusted science quiz for 6-11 year old children, followed by a science demonstration and award ceremony.
To join us of this free event, email us at info@littlehouseofscience.com with the full name and age of your child.

 Young Scientist Award 2016

 

 

 

 

Summer Term 2016 starts again on 25 Apr-11 Jul 2016 (May half-term 30 May-4 Jun)

 

 

Dear Parents, dear Little Scientists, Veronika, Liliana, Elisabeth and your Little House of Science team wish you all a very Happy Holiday and a wonderful start to the new year!
Thank you for all your support in 2015. It has been a fantastic year and we look forward to a fabulous year ahead with exciting new topics, further workshops at the Royal Society and numerous other events.


And, we will be announcing the 2016 date for "Young Scientist of the Year Award" again soon!

Please don't forget to sign up to your class if you haven't already done so! We look forward to seeing you in January!

 

Warm wishes, Veronika, Liliana, Elisabeth & Team


 

Little Discovery with Little House of Science - Time: 11.45am-12.25pm 23 Oct 2015 - At Eddie Catz Putney

Little Discovery is a wonderful way of introducing babies to the magical world around us! Every class is dedicated to a different topic related to nature and the magnificent world of discovery!

Classes are filled with baby experiencing stimulating images, listening to exciting new sounds and music (including classical genre), discovering new textures and sensations!

Join us for a teaser session at Eddie Catz about the spectacular world of BIRDS! Feathers, nests, eggs, colours, flight, birds songs, all in one session! 

To register today (cost £7), email us: info@littlehouseofscience.com

 

 

 

Royal Society Summer Exhibtion 2015 - Littlehouseofscience Children's section

We hope you had a chance to visit us at this years Royal Society Summer Exhibition (4-5 July 2015), we had very exctiting 2 days supporting the Royal Society in running their childrens' section and the amount of future Little Scientists were absolutely amazing. Great to see such scienctifically minded and interested kids out there!

Littlehouseofscience at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015

 Brian Cox at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015Little Scientist at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015Little Scientist at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015school science workshopsscience experimentsLittle Scientist at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015Brian Cox at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015LHS at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015Little Scientist at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, 2015

 

Little House of Science together with the IOP (Institute of Physics in London) - Young Scientist of the Year Award 2015

It was such a great morning and all Little and Big Scientists did so well with the quiz. A big THANK YOU also to the IOP for creating such a fabulous demonstration on the solar system for our kids.

See you all and many new faces again next year!

holiday activities for kidsgroup photocertificate signed by Brian Coxvery young scientiestIOP workshopLittlehouseofscience Young Scientist Award 2015 at IOPLittlehouseofscience Young Scientist Award 2015 at IOPLittlehouseofscience Young Scientist Award 2015 at IOPwinner of 8-11 quizLittlehouseofscience Young Scientist Award 2015 at IOPgroup photo

 

  

Dear Little Scientists,

Exciting news! Little House of Science together with the IOP (Institute of Physics in London) are partnering to launch the "Young Scientist of the Year Award 2015" for 6- 11 year olds!

Come & join us on:

When: Saturday, 27th June 2015
Where: IOP, 76 Portland Place, London W1B 1NT
Time: 10:00-12:00 (kids quiz 10:00-10:45 with Free Workshop to follow and prize giving)
Requirements: 6-11 years (age adjusted quiz) and a passion for science!
Registration: info@littlehouseofscience.com

(Limited spaces, registration required by 17th June).

We look forward to seeing you!

 

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